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1916 World Series Game 5 Braves Field PSA 1 Ticket Stub - Red Sox Fourth Title

Lot Number 667

Quantity: Bid Starts: 11/02/2015 12:00:00 
Bid Open: 1200.00  Bid Ends: 11/12/2015 23:30:00 
Bid Count: Overtime: 30 Minutes
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Description

Before the Yankees ever had back-to-back winning seasons (let alone a postseason appearance), before Yankee Stadium was even an idea, the Boston Red Sox were armed with the mythical figure who was to ignite the Bronx torch and were far and away the game’s most dominant team. Encapsulated and Graded PR 1 by PSA, this ticket stub was issued at Braves Field for Game 5 of the 1916 World Series as the BoSox became the first franchise to win four Fall Classic crowns. One of two at its tier with only one graded higher, this scarce survivor features printed seating/event details and a “GAME 3” identifier to signify the third game played in Boston (the Red Sox used Braves Field because of its seating capacity). As 21-year-old Babe Ruth sat in the dugout that day, teammate Ernie Shore limited Brooklyn to three hits in a complete game that lasted all of 1:43. Shore had been Ruth’s teammate with the Baltimore Orioles of the International League and was purchased by the Red Sox (along with Ruth and Ben Egan) on July 9, 1914. With a clean reverse and uneven admission tear, this rare October prize presents nicer than the technical assessment suggests!

In Ruth’s shadow despite his own pitching heroics, Shore replaced Ruth (who had been ejected after walking the first batter on four pitches) on July 23, 1917. The base runner was gunned down on an attempted steal of second base and Shore went on to complete a “perfect” game by retiring all 26 men he faced. Still, it was (and still is) Ruth who gets the notoriety for that day’s events as his assault on umpire Brick Owens garnered more headlines that Shore’s mound gem. Shore enlisted in the military for World War I. Ruth got married and did not enlist. By 1921, Shore’s career was over. Ruth’s of course, was just beginning.



 
 
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